Listen Live WZAK Cleveland

LIKE US ON FACEBOOK. FOLLOW US ON TWITTER AND INSTAGRAM. SUBSCRIBE ON YOUTUBE.

CLOSE

 

“Selma” may still have a chance to win some Oscars, but the Ava DuVernay directed film about the 1965 march from Selma to Montgomery that ended in bloodshed was shut out of big Golden Globes wins.

Common and John Legend did pick up a Globe for best original song “Glory,” the movie’s theme song. They were presented the award by Prince, a surprise guest. Accepting the Globe Common drew a laugh when he said: “I want to thank God and the Hollywood Foreign Press.”

Among other Golden Globe surprises was Richard Linklater’s 12-years-in-the-making “Boyhood” winning the night’s top honor, best drama, as well as best director for Linklater and best supporting actress for Patricia Arquette.

The sweetly humanist film had a similarly touching effect on one of Hollywood’s glitziest evenings. Taking out her written speech, Arquette apologized: “I’m the only nerd with a piece of paper.”

“Bottom line is we’re all flawed in this world. No one’s perfect,” said Linklater. “I want to dedicate this to parents that are evolving everywhere and families that are just passing through this world and doing their best.”

The night seemed to be setting up for the top two Oscar contenders — “Boyhood” and Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu’s “Birdman” — to lead the Globes’ twin categories of drama and comedy. But in a major surprise, Wes Anderson’s “Grand Budapest Hotel” swooped in to win best picture, comedy or musical. He listed a mock thank you to the members of the Hollywood Foreign Press, the collection of mostly freelance foreign journalists who put on the Globes, naming “Yorum and Dagmar and Yukiko and Mounawar.”

“Birdman” nevertheless won best actor in a comedy or musical for its lead, Michael Keaton, who plays a former superhero star mounting a serious play on Broadway, and best screenplay.

Reflecting on his life, Keaton’s voice broke up as he thanked his son, whom he called his best friend. “Shoot,” he said. “Two things I swore I wasn’t going to do: cry and give air quotes.”

Kicking off the show, hosts Tina Fey and Amy Poehler wasted no time in skewering Hollywood’s most tender subjects: the hacking of Sony Pictures over “The Interview,” the sexual assault allegations against Bill Cosby and television’s rise as a cultural rival to movies.

In an opening blistering with zingers, the duo welcomed Hollywood’s “despicable, spoiled, minimally talented brats” to the Globes to celebrate “all the movies that North Korea was OK with.” They several times visited with a North Korea government character, played by Margaret Cho, who voiced her displeasure with all aspects of the show.

“Je Suis Charlie” reverberated through the ceremony, from signs held aloft on the red carpet by the likes of Helen Mirren to the speeches of Cecil B. DeMille winner George Clooney, who evoked the name of the satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo that was recently attacked by deadly terrorists. HFPA President Theo Kingma drew a standing ovation for pledging support to free speech “from North Korea to Paris.”

Clooney, a young lifetime achievement honoree at 53, had been among Hollywood’s most vocal about preserving free speech after hackers threatened violence over “The Interview.”

Read more at http://www.newsnet5.com/newsy/the-golden-globes-without-weirdos-they-just-werent-fun

Also On 93.1 WZAK:
10 Times Meghan Markle Gave Us Duchess Of Sussex Glamour
10 photos